Essential Poker Box Packaging- What to Include in Your Sleeve and Tray

Wholesale personalized poker cards are made of paper stock and coated with a varnish or plastic material. The coating is designed to wear off from the high-wear parts on the face side, such as the corners and edges first. This results in a deck that becomes increasingly marked over time, providing an additional level of authenticity for casino players who want their decks to look used by other gamblers before them.

Most poker cards used throughout casinos have been produced through sheet-fed lithography press technology since around 1965 because it has become cheaper than traditional offset printing methods, which only allowed mass production after many years of development. In this process, oil-based ink is applied directly onto very thick papers similar to those used for currency note printing. There are no cardboards involved. After the cards are printed, they go through a series of roller coating machines where the excess ink is carefully removed from the surface before being stacked together in very high-speed presses to have their four edges cut off simultaneously.

Tray boxes, also known as tuck boxes or simply card boxes, are used by poker players worldwide to store and protect decks during transport or play. Cardboard trays vary widely in size, but most are just under three inches wide, making them perfect for storing a standard-sized 54-cards deck without any case. A slipcase sleeve made out of clear plastic can be added on top if you prefer your playing cards not exposed.

Cases offer much more protection than sleeves since they completely encase both sides of each playing card. They also provide a professional appearance, especially if you have a foil logo on the back of your cards, as some custom playing card decks do.

Even though poker cases seem very similar to each other and come in only one shape, they can be divided into four main categories: standard size (for holding just one deck), bridge size (holds two decks), jumbo sizes for large novelty oversized cards and mini-cases, which many artists use. It’s important not to confuse these last ones with tuck box-type trays that players use to store their decks. In fact, most small cases share exactly the same dimensions as custom sleeve& tray boxes, so it is easy to mix them up when trying to fit something inside. A big difference between sleeves and trays is that sleeves are usually made of plastic or paper, while trays use rigid cardboard.

Poker box packaging is an important part of the poker game experience. It can make or break a player’s mood before they even start playing! Poker boxes are typically wrapped in high-quality paper that features the brand name, logo, and other pertinent information about the product inside. The sleeve is what holds your cards together while you’re not using them, and it should be made out of thin cardboard to avoid damaging your cards.

Poker box packaging is an important part of your product’s presentation. A sleeve and tray can make or break how customers feel about the quality of your poker set. It doesn’t matter if you are selling at a store, online, or on an auction site; people want to know that they are buying something that has been taken care of with love and attention to detail. If you have never heard the term before, it refers to the package that holds one deck of cards in a fold-out cardboard box. The sleeve is where all individual decks go – each wrapped in plastic wrap for protection – while the tray has slots for each deck so players can easily see which card they need without having to fumble around inside their sleeves looking for.

It’s common for companies to overlook the importance of packaging when it comes to selling their products. What is your product, and how should it be packaged? What are the most important aspects to focus on when designing a package that will sell your product? When you decide what kind of packaging you want for your company, there are many factors to take into account. In this blog post, we’ll discuss some essential poker box packaging tips that will help you design a sleeve and tray box with better customer engagement, increased sales, and a more polished look.

When designing a package, you’ll need to figure out the most important aspects for your product. There are many factors that go into choosing an effective box design, and you should keep all of these in mind while making your decision. Let’s take a look at some of these considerations:

First things first! You will want to make sure that the sleeve or tray is designed with durability in mind so it can protect its contents during shipping, storage, and even daily use. The last thing you want is for something inside to be damaged because its packaging didn’t properly protect it before being used. When considering how durable the material needs to be, think about where this item will be stored or shipped to/from? Are there chemicals or liquids that might come into contact with it? Will this be used on a regular basis, and is the product meant to last for years, not just months? You will also want to consider how often you plan on shipping this poker box out. What kind of climate does your target market live in (are they affected by extreme weather)? Do certain areas require special treatment of packages so as not to damage them due to high altitude/humidity levels etc.?

Once you have made sure that whatever sleeve or tray materials are chosen can actually do their job, then you need to think about how attractive those options really are aesthetically speaking. For example, if using a plastic sleeve – what type of material would work best: PVC, PETG, ABS, etc.? What color? And what about your box itself? Is it sturdy enough to not look cheap or flimsy – will the card stock you use for that be able to handle being cut and stacked on a regular basis without wearing out too quickly.

Addressing these questions is important when developing an entire product line because if some components are subpar, then your customers won’t remain loyal no matter how good they may think the overall value proposition is.

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